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Student-Led Geriatric Nursing Conference: Evidence in Practice

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Materials 

1.  Large lecture hall or open space appropriate for a keynote speaker presentation. 

2.  Adequate space to facilitate several concurrent podium presentation sessions. This space should also be conducive to 15 minutes or less of transition from one group presentation to another. 

3.  One full day, ideally towards the end of the semester, that all students, full-time faculty, part-time faculty, and adjunct faculty can reserve for conference attendance. 

4.  Conference brochure: the conference brochure should provide a clear itinerary for the day. It should also allow students to share with peers, faculty, and other members of the academic community who attend the conference the depth and breadth of their nursing scholarship. 

Click here to view a sample brochure from the 2010 and 2011 Conference at Community College of Philadelphia. It will provide an overview of the types of presentations selected by the students and faculty. 

5.  Suggested Tools: 

A.  ConsultGeriRN.org, the website of the Hartford Institute for Geriatric Nursing at New York University’s College of Nursing, contains the most essential geriatric assessment tools. The How to Try This series is recommended for use by students as they consider best practices in clinical settings and how use of assessment data can influence care decisions. 

I.   As an example, one year a group of students addressed the fall risk protocol on their clinical unit and discovered that the assessment being used at the hospital was not evidence- based.  As a result of the conference, the students were able to use the Hendrich II Fall Risk Assessment Tool to provide improved assessment of fall risk on their clinical unit. 

Tool - Video

II.  As a second example, students found the clinical protocol for pain assessment to be limited for patients with delirium or dementia; using the How to Try This Pain Assessment Scale and adapting it to clients with cognitive impairment, they were able to improve comfort guidelines on their clinical unit. 

Tool - Video


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